Pinar del Rio, Cuba 9.18.08

September 23, 2008

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Pinar del Rio, Cuba  9.18.08

Pinar del Rio, Cuba  9.18.08

Pinar del Rio, Cuba  9.18.08

Pinar del Rio, Cuba 9.18.08 Pinar del Rio, Cuba 9.18.08

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Fast Facts: Hurricanes Gustav and Ike 9.22.08

September 22, 2008

The following statistics indicate the statistics for Hurricane Ike in Texas and the combined figures of Hurricanes Ike and Gustav for Louisiana.

In Texas:

In Louisiana:


Audio: Our Evacuated Families & Friends

September 19, 2008

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vworrallphilly‘s Mobile post sent by AmRedCross using Utterlireply-count Replies.  mp3

Photos: Cabaret, Haiti 9.17.08

September 17, 2008

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Hurricane Gustav, Caberet, Haiti 9.17.08

Hurricane Gustav, Caberet, Haiti 9.17.08

Hurricane Gustav, Caberet, Haiti 9.17.08


Release: Baton Rouge, LA 9.17.08

September 17, 2008

American Red Cross Urges Residents to use Caution After Hurricane Landfall

Dangers Exist Even After Storm Passes

[BATON ROUGE], LA, September 17, 2008 – There are still as many as 13 Red Cross shelters open throughout Louisiana for a safe place to stay and access to food. For more information on sheltering, call 1-866-GET-INFO (438-4636).

After a hurricane, when local authorities determine it is safe to return to areas impacted by the hurricanes, the American Red Cross urges residents to use caution. Carbon monoxide poisoning, injuries from debris and downed power lines, food and water safety, and emotional support should all be top concerns for you and your loved ones.

In the aftermath of a hurricane:
• Stay tuned to local radio or television for recovery information.
• Listen to the advice of local authorities.
• Help injured or trapped persons. Check the scene for safety and call for help. Give appropriate first aid if you are trained. Don’t move the seriously injured unless they are in immediate danger of further injury or you have to move them to provide care.
• Drive only if absolutely necessary and avoid flooded roads and washed-out bridges.
• Use telephone only for emergency calls. Keep phone lines open.

Return home only after authorities advise that it is safe to do so and:
• Wear protective shoes, long pants, long sleeve shirts and gloves to protect you from sharp edges and other hazards.
• Avoid loose or dangling power lines, reporting them immediately to the power company, police or fire department.
• Before entering, check the outside of your home for damage such as cracks in the foundation or broken utilities that make it too dangerous to enter.
• Enter your home with caution. Look for sagging in the ceiling that may indicate water trapped there. Check for loose flooring.
• Smell for gas. If you detect a natural gas or propane odor or hear a hissing noise, leave immediately and contact the fire department or utility company.
• Avoid using sinks, showers and toilets if you suspect sewage lines are damaged.
• Beware of snakes, insects or animals driven to higher ground by floodwater.
• Open windows and doors to ventilate and dry your home.
• Throw out all food, beverages and medicine exposed to floodwaters and mud, including canned goods, capped bottles and sealed containers. When in doubt, throw it out.
• Take pictures of the damage to the house and its contents for insurance claims.

Power outage safety tips
• Only use a flashlight for emergency lighting. Never use candles.
• Turn off electrical equipment you were using when the power went out.
• Avoid opening the refrigerator and freezer.
• Do not run a generator inside a home or garage.
• If you use a generator, connect the equipment you want to power directly to the outlets on the generator. Do not connect a generator to a home’s electrical system.
• Listen to local radio and television for updated information.
• People can download a generator fact sheet in both English and Spanish here: http://www.redcross.org/services/disaster/0,1082,0_565_,00.html

If concerned about missing family/friends:
• Contact your out-of-area emergency contact to check if family member has made contact with them
• Check the Safe and Well Web site, accessible via http://www.redcross.org. This public site enables people within a disaster area to select and post standard messages for friends and family that indicate they are at a shelter, home or hotel, and will make contact when they are able.

The Red Cross encourages everyone to get “Red Cross Ready” for a variety of disasters, such as hurricanes, by taking three basic preparedness actions: 1) Get a kit, 2) Make a plan and 3) Be informed. For more information, visit http://www.redcross.org or contact your local chapter of the American Red Cross.


Additional Information:

  • Media Contact: Local Red Cross Public Affairs Desk – (571) 918-5223

Photos: Hurricane Gustav, Caberet, Haiti 9.17.08

September 17, 2008

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Hurricane Gustav and Ike, Caberet, Haiti 9.17.08

Hurricanes Gustav and Ike, Caberet, Haiti 9.17.08

Hurricane Gustav and Ike, Caberet, Haiti 9.17.08


Release: Southeast Louisiana Chapter 9.17.08

September 17, 2008

American Red Cross shelters, feeding in
Southeast Louisiana

Update as of 11 a.m., Sept. 17, 2008

SHELTERS
As residents put their lives and homes back together after Hurricane Gustav and the effects of Hurricane Ike, the American Red Cross Southeast Louisiana Chapter is transitioning shelters daily, based on needs, as electricity continues to be restored. More than 5,380 people spent the night in Red Cross shelters.

Today, shelters are open in:
1. Lafourche: Larose Civic Center (307 E. 5th St., Cut Off, La.)
2. Terrebonne: Devon Keller Memorial Center (5575 Bayou Black Drive, Gibson, La.)
3. Terrebonne: Dumas Recreation Center (Tunnel Blvd. at Barataria Ave., Houma, La.)
4. Terrebonne: Schriever gymnasium (102 Kelsi Drive, Schriever, La.)
Anyone evacuating to a Red Cross shelter should bring essential items for each member of the family:
1. Prescription and emergency medications
2. Foods and water
3. Identification and important personal documents
4. Change of clothing, pillows, blankets, hygiene supplies and other comfort items
5. Supplies needed for children and infants, such as diapers, formula and toys
6. Special items for family members who are elderly or disabled

FEEDING
As electricity is nearly restored throughout the New Orleans metro area, Red Cross emergency feeding efforts are focused on bayou areas where residents need food due to flooding and/or power outages. The Red Cross has served approximately 220,500 meals and 140,180 snacks to residents who have been impacted by the storms. Red Cross mobile routes and fixed feeding sites will be adjusted daily to meet local needs.

Fixed Feeding Locations:
1. Lafitte Town Hall, Laffitte
2. St. Patrick’s Church, 28698 Hwy. 23, Port Sulfur
3. Fire Station, 4176 Privateer, Barataria
4. Town Hall (Strip Mall), 506 Barrow St., Houma
5. Larose Civic Center, 307 E. 5th Street, Larose
6. Grand Isle Community Center, 3211 Louisiana Highway, Grand Isle
7. Grand Caillou Baptist Church, off Hwy 57, towards Town of Dulac
8. Knights of Columbus, Hwy 665, Point Aux Chenes
9. Montegut Recreation Center, 107 Recreation Dr., Montegut
10. First Baptist Church, Highway #1, Golden Meadow
11. Ward 7 Citizens Club, 5006 Hwy 56, Chauvin

As more areas flooded by Hurricane Ike in southeast Louisiana are reopened to the public, the Red Cross will set up fixed feeding sites and mobile feeding routes to serve residents until normal conditions are restored.


Additional Information: